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Medical Xpress Mesenchymal Cells News Query

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The News summary below is based on the query - "Mesenchymal + Cells"
 

Medical Xpress - latest medical and health news stories

21 April 2019

Medical Xpress internet news portal provides the latest news on Health and Medicine.
  • Scientists discover an interaction that helps cancers spread to bone
    A Princeton-led team of researchers have discovered a factor that promotes the spread of cancers to bone, opening the way toward treatments that could mitigate cancer's ability to colonize bone. The study by Mark Esposito, Yibin Kang and colleagues appears in the April 15 issue of Nature Cell Biology.
  • Clinical trial shows promise of stem cells in offering safe, effective relief from arthritic knees
    Stem cells collected from the patient's own bone marrow holds great interest as a potential therapy for osteoarthritis of the knee (KOA) because of their ability to regenerate the damaged cartilage. The results were released today in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine (SCTM).
  • Human iPSC-derived MSCs from aged individuals acquire a rejuvenation signature
    The use of primary mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is fraught with aging-related shortfalls such as limited expansion and early senescence. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived MSCs (iMSCs) comprise a useful, clinically relevant source of MSCs that circumvent these aging-associated drawbacks. The importance of this concept is manifested by the successful phase 1 clinical trial for the treatment of GvHD by Cynata Therapeutics and the National Health Service of the U.K. A phase 2 trial is planned for 2019. This trial is independent of the work carried out by Spitzhorn et al.-described below.
  • Leukocytes use their nucleus as a ruler to choose path of least resistance
    How do mobile cell types like leukocytes or metastatic cancer cells reach their place of action during immune surveillance or cancer dissemination, respectively? The research group around Michael Sixt at IST Austria has now shown that leukocytes use their nucleus as a ruler to screen their surroundings for the largest pores—and thereby find the path of least resistance.
  • Colorado drug takes aim at cancer metastasis
    Many cancers are relatively harmless at their site of origin, and it is only when they metastasize to sites like the brain, bones, lungs, and liver that they become especially dangerous. And so, in addition to stopping the growth of cancer at its primary site, an ongoing goal of cancer research is to keep cancer contained—to stop its ability to travel through the body. A University of Colorado Cancer Center study presented at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2019 offers another step in an ongoing line of research aimed at exactly that.
  • 'Moving target' breast cancer cells revealed by new imaging technique
    Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers have developed a new imaging technique to visualise key steps in the evolution of cancer cells within tumours, potentially revealing how breast cancers evade treatment.
  • Rejuvenation of aging cells helps to cure osteoarthritis through gene therapy
    Aging is a risk factor for the development of osteoarthritis (OA), a chronic disease characterized by degeneration of articular cartilage leading to pain and physical disability. Senescent mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are found in cartilage tissues isolated from patients suffering from osteoarthritis. Notably, senescent MSCs have been regarded as an important therapeutic target for geroprotection against tissue degeneration.
  • A new drug promises to lower risks of asthma attack
    A recent study shows that a gamechanger drug called Fevipiprant promises to lower patients' risks of suffering an asthma attack and being admitted to a hospital.
  • How 'sleeper cell' cancer stem cells are maintained in chronic myelogenous leukemia
    Most patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia can be treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. These drugs are highly effective and lead to deep remission and prolonged survival. Yet quiescent leukemic stem cells persist in these patients, and they therefore must continue inhibitor treatment to maintain remission.
  • Research implicates causative genes in osteoporosis, suggesting new targets for future therapy
    Scientists have harnessed powerful data analysis tools and three-dimensional studies of genomic geography to implicate new risk genes for osteoporosis, the chronic bone-weakening condition that affects millions of people. Knowing the causative genes may later open the door to more effective treatments.

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