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TOPIC: Does meat rot in your colon?

Does meat rot in your colon? 02 Jul 2015 13:15 #4777

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Just to torture you folks a bit with some physiology and biochemistry again, since I happen to feel like it.. :grin: :yep:

Yesterday I had my third colonoscopy since my colon cancer surgery 2,5 years ago. Just this time, I decided that I wanted to see my colon from the inside myself and therefore opted out on sedation. Good thing is, I am excused for the next three years, the bad thing- despite the nice video show on the Olympus endoscope, a nap is definitely more comfortable, especially if your gastroenterologist starts cutting out polyps from the tract.... :whistle:

In the week-end I read this amazing and inspiring article and as a result decided I would start with an Atkins type diet straight away after the procedure, since my system would be all cleaned out and I would only have 2-3 days of glucose in my liver in the form of glycogen and therefore be on ketogenesis in no time... the article was titled as follows..:

Does Meat Rot In Your Colon? No. What Does? Beans, Grains, and Vegetables!


How many times have we all heard this bunk myth repeated?
“Humans can’t actually digest meat: it rots in the colon.”
And its variant: “Meat takes 4-7 days to digest, because it has to rot in your stomach first.”
(Some variations on this myth claim it takes up to two months!)

Like most vegetarian propaganda, it’s not just false, it’s an inversion of truth. As the proverb says, “When you point your finger, your other three fingers point back at you.” Let’s take a short trip through the digestive system to see why!
A Trip Through The Human Digestive System (abridged)
Briefly, the function of digestion is to break food down as far as possible—hopefully into individual fats, amino acids (the building blocks of protein), and sugars (the building blocks of carbohydrates) which can be absorbed through the intestinal wall and used by our bodies.
Here we go!
We crush food in the mouth, where amylase (an enzyme) breaks down some of the starches. In the stomach, pepsin (another enzyme) breaks down proteins, and strong hydrochloric acid (pH 1.5-3, average of 2…this is why it stings when you vomit) further dissolves everything. The resulting acidic slurry is called ‘chyme’—and right away we can see that the “meat rots in your stomach” theory is baloney. Nothing ‘rots’ in a vat of pH 2 hydrochloric acid and pepsin.
On average, a ‘mixed meal’ (including meat) takes 4-5 hours to completely leave the stomach—so we’ve busted yet another part of the myth. (Keep in mind that we have not absorbed any nutrients yet: we’re still breaking everything down.)


Eventually our pyloric valve opens, and our stomach releases the chyme, bit by bit, into our small intestine—where a collection of salts and enzymes goes to work. Bile emulsifies fats and helps neutralize stomach acid; lipase breaks down fats; trypsin and chymotrypsin break down proteins; and enzymes like amylase, maltase, sucrase, and (in the lactose-tolerant) lactase break down starches and some sugars. Meanwhile, the surface of the small intestine absorbs anything that our enzymes have broken down into sufficiently small components—usually individual amino acids, simple sugars, and free fatty acids.

Finally our ileocecal valve opens, and our small intestine releases what’s left into our large intestine—which is a giant bacterial colony, containing literally trillions of bacteria! And the reason we have a bacterial colony in our colon is because our own enzymes can’t break down everything we eat. So our gut bacteria go to work and digest some of the remainder, sometimes producing waste products that we can absorb. (And, often, a substantial quantity of farts.) The remaining indigestible plant matter (“fiber”), dead gut bacteria, and other waste emerge as feces.



It turns out that pepsin, trypsin, chymotrypsin, and our other proteases do a fine job of breaking down meat protein, and bile salts and lipase do a fine job of breaking down animal fat. In other words, meat is digested by enzymes produced by our own bodies. The primary reason we need our gut bacteria is to digest the sugars, starches, and fiber—found in grains, beans, and vegetables—that our digestive enzymes can’t break down.
Now what is that called, again, when food is being ‘digested’ by bacteria…?
rot \ˈrät\ (verb) — to undergo decomposition from the action of bacteria or fungi
In other words, meat doesn’t rot in your colon. GRAINS, BEANS, and VEGETABLES rot in your colon. And that is a fact.


The rest of the article you can read at Gnolls.org- the discussion on the article is quite stimulating... :grin: :bye:

Link to article: Does meat rot in your colon?

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Board moderator and Site-owner. I still regret the day I started analysing the prospects of MacroPore (now Cytori) back in 2004- a left-over from the tech-bubble at that time from the century change in my portfolio- and became addicted to Cytori´s fat cell technology. :cry:

Does meat rot in your colon? 02 Jul 2015 14:13 #4778

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Thanks Fas,

I won't feel as guilty when I fire up the grill tomorrow and dine on some sausage and burgers for the 4th of July celebrations!

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Does meat rot in your colon? 03 Jul 2015 04:54 #4784

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I won't feel as guilty when I fire up the grill tomorrow and dine on some sausage and burgers for the 4th of July celebrations!


No reason for that at all- its only natural behaviour- celebrations are positive and therefore "good". :yep:

Anyway- my plan worked, after two days already halfway (40 mg/dl) in ketosis i.e. fat burning mode. :bye:
The following user(s) said Thank You: mtpinman

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Board moderator and Site-owner. I still regret the day I started analysing the prospects of MacroPore (now Cytori) back in 2004- a left-over from the tech-bubble at that time from the century change in my portfolio- and became addicted to Cytori´s fat cell technology. :cry:
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